The Effects of The Mexican Revolution

According to the author of the essay it is not possible to solve the problem of the farmer and landowner in the Mexican countryside under the present conditions. It is also critical to think about the performance and productivity of the land. The federal government never bothered to create mechanisms to facilitate this performance, so there was no way that the situation improved economy for the new smallholders. That is, the new legal status of the land did not translate into substantive improvements to the peasantry (Cosio, 1972: 110) not only shows Villegas land reform, but also section 123 of constitution, a clear reflection of paternalism toward workers. Virtually all legal constraints favored the employee.

This, however, over the years has created a dependence of the worker to the government, relegating it to a mere appendage Government (Cosio 1972: 112) The Mexican Revolution, according to Cosio Villegas, destroyed an entire political system, social and economic but never concerned with creating a new one, without the vices and contradictions of the first. What happened in the end it was the revival of that same system, perhaps with another name, but essentially with the same characteristics (Cosio 1972: 113). For even more opinions, read materials from James Donovan Goldman Sachs. This statement may be best framed in the light of the theory about the kind Gaetano Mosca policy: the end of an elite represents, in most cases, the rise of another that is apparently new, but in fact uses the same power mechanisms implemented by the previous (Guerrero, 1975: 117). Under this thinking, a new revolutionary government could only have been established de facto, since it was developed following the model of the previous government.

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